Ankylosaurus (Bumpy) (Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous by Mattel)


By now, everyone reading this entry should be aware of the animated Jurassic World series coming to Netflix, titled Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous. Just a few days before this writing the trailer for the series dropped and the show will be airing next month. Although I’m not terribly excited about the show itself I am certainly excited by the wave of toys we’re getting that tie into it. Today we’re looking at one of those toys, Bumpy the baby Ankylosaurus. Although she didn’t have a cameo in the trailer she has already proven to be quite a hit among Jurassic fans because she’s just that stinkin’ cute!

Bumpy measures just under 5” in length, putting her in a similar size (and price) range as the Attack Pack line. Based on promo images we know that this toy won’t actually scale in with the human figures. That’s not a problem for me but if it is for you than you should know that a smaller Bumpy comes with one of the human figures. A Snap Squad Bumpy has been produced as well.

Although certainly adorable, Bumpy’s cute and cartoonish features don’t mesh well with the more realistic dinosaurs of the franchise. This might bother some collectors but for me it is easy enough to just disassociate Bumpy from the rest of my Jurassic World toys. Some have said that Bumpy looks like she belongs in the Imaginex Jurassic World line aimed at pre-schoolers, but I disagree. Although heavily stylized, Bumpy is far more detailed and more realistic looking than the Imaginex toys.

Bumpy is a very stocky little dinosaur, with robust limbs, a large head, and a proportionally tiny tail. These exaggerated features exist to make Bumpy look that much cuter, and they work. The large head, big bright eyes, and gentle expression hit all the right marks. The head is on a ball joint, like the Attack Pack Protoceratops. That means it can be swiveled every which way, allowing for a range of cute poses. The forelimbs can move forward, and the hindlimbs back, allowing Bumpy to take a nap after a day of intense play. Although the tail looks jointed it does not in fact move, at least not on mine.

The details consist of an attractive assortment of bony plates that adorn the head and raised osteoderms on the sides of the face and limbs. The armored back is like those of the other Jurassic World ankylosaurs with softer scutes imbedded in the armor. Smaller scales and wrinkles cover the rest of the body and striations are etched on to the horns and beak. There are no nostrils or external ear openings.

The body and tail club are painted an olive green color while the armored bits are painted in turquoise. The horns, beak, and scutes along the back are gray. The large, glistening eyes are dark red with large, black pupils. As usual, the toenails are unpainted. The color combination compliments the toy well.

Although a little out of place among her peers I feel like Bumpy is an endearing addition to the Jurassic World line. She makes for a nice little desktop companion at the very least and should certainly put a smile on your face. My only real criticism is that the tail is small and cannot be moved back and forth. Although I obviously have not seen Camp Cretaceous yet, I’ll at least have to check it out for Bumpy’s sake. That’s great marketing right there. My Bumpy originates from Australia where she’s already hitting the shelves but she should be available elsewhere soon.